Pruning

Tree pruning is an art based on scientific principles of tree care. Arborists have the capability to make it look more attractive. The idea of pruning live growth is based on restricting growth in one area and encouraging growth in the other area, while eliminating damaged or dead limbs.

Tree trimming encourages growth, improves flower and fruit production, improves plant health, repairs damage and helps add aesthetic appeal to a tree. For optimum health, tree trimming at the right time can be very critical.



Pruning Techniques
Specific types of pruning may be necessary to maintain a mature tree in a healthy, safe, and attractive condition.

Cleaning is the removal of dead, dying, diseased, crowded, weakly attached, and low-vigor branches from the crown of a tree.

Thinning is the selective removal of branches to increase light penetration and air movement through the crown. Thinning opens the foliage of a tree, reduces weight on heavy limbs, and helps retain the tree’s natural shape.

Raising removes the lower branches from a tree in order to provide clearance for buildings, vehicles, pedestrians, and vistas.

Reduction reduces the size of a tree, often for clearance for utility lines. Reducing the height or spread of a tree is best accomplished by pruning back the leaders and branch terminals to lateral branches that are large enough to assume the terminal roles (at least one-third the diameter of the cut stem). Compared to topping, reduction helps maintain the form and structural integrity of the tree.